Historic Public Schools

The High School of Music & Art

Hamilton Heights, Harlem, Manhattan The New York Training School for Teachers/New York Model School was built in 1924-26 to the design of William H. Gompert, Architect and Superintendent of School Buildings for the Board of Education, and prominently sited in the Hamilton Heights section of Harlem adjacent to City College. This was the first building constructed expressly for the Training School (and its "model school" for practice teaching), first opened in 1898 and one of three municipal teacher-training schools maintained by the Board of Education to assure an adequate supply of teachers for the city's school system. Most of New York's elementary school teachers, the vast majority of them women, were trained at these schools during their period of operation. The five- and six-story (plus basement and central tower) L-shaped New York Training School for Teachers/New York Model School was designed in an abstracted contemporary Collegiate Gothic style and clad in limestone and mottled buff-to- brown ironspot brick, with large window bays filled with unusual folding-casement steel sash windows. Exterior articulation, divided vertically by pavilions, buttresses, and square towers, also differentiated the model school and training school portions, as well as a "churchlike" wing housing an auditorium above which is a gymnasium. The Training School became the New York Teachers Training College (1931-33), which was abolished during the Depression when there was a surplus of teachers for the city's school system. The building later housed Public School 193 (1933-52) and, for nearly fifty years, the High School of Music and Art. Established in 1936 by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia and considered to be the first public high school in the United States specializing in the study of music and art, the High School of Music and Art produced many graduates who have distinguished themselves in the professions of music, the arts, and education, among others. After the sc

The New York Training School for Teachers was built in 1924-26 to the design of William H. Gompert, Architect and Superintendent of School Buildings for the New York City Board of Education.

The beautiful building is prominently sited in the Hamilton Heights section of Harlem adjacent to City College. This was the first building constructed expressly for the Training School programs.

The five- and six-story (plus basement and central tower) L-shaped New York Training School for Teachers was designed in an abstracted contemporary Collegiate Gothic style. It is built of limestone and mottled buff-to-brown ironspot brick.

The building has gorgeous window bays filled with unusual folding-casement steel sash windows. The windows are divided vertically by pavilions, buttresses, and square towers. The training school has a “churchlike” wing housing an auditorium above which is a gymnasium.
The Training School became the New York Teachers Training College (1931-33), which was abolished during the Depression when tCNY-HSMAhere was a surplus of teachers for the city’s school system. The building later housed Public School 193 (1933-1935).

*For nearly fifty years, the building housed the High School of Music and Art, established in 1936 by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia. It was considered to be the first public high school in the United States specializing in the study of music and art. The High School of Music and Art produced many distinguished graduates.

Some of the school’s distinguished graduates include Nat Adderley, Jr, Diahann Carroll, Melissa Manchester, Peter Nero, Laura Nyro, Billy Cobham, Patricia Brooks, Gloria Davy, and Reri Grist.

The hiimages-3-150x150storic teacher training building became the A. Philip Randolph Campus High School, a public secondary school, in 1979. Formerly occupied by The High School of Music & Art, the A. Philip Randolph Campus High School is an educational collaboration between the Board of Education and The City College of New York.

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Stadium High School 

DSCF0995Stadium High School is a more than 100-year-old high school in Tacoma, Washington and a historic landmark. It is part of Tacoma Public Schools, or Tacoma School District No. 10 and is located in the Stadium District, near downtown Tacoma.

The original building burned to a shell while it was still a partially constructed hotel designed by Hewitt & Hewitt. It was reconstructed for use as a school according to designs by Frederick Heath, and a “bowl” stadium was added.

Original construction began in 1891 with the intention of building a luxury hotel DSCF1011resembling a French château. The Panic of 1893, however, brought construction to an abrupt halt when the Northern Pacific was faced with financial disaster.

The unfinished building became a storage facility, with much of the building materials still inside. On October 11, 1898, the building was gutted by a massive fire. The walls remained standing, and the Northern Pacific began to dismantle the structure, removing some 40,000 bricks that would be used to construct still-existing train stations in Missoula, Montana, and Wallace, Idaho.

Destroyed by fire

The Tacoma School District purchased the gutted building on February 19, 1904, with the intent of turning it into a high school. The reconstructed building opened on September 10, 1906, as Tacoma High School. Seven years later, the name was changed to reference the adjacent Stadium Bowl.

Later additions included a circular lunchroom, an underground swimming pool, a science and industrial arts complex, a gymnasium, and a multi-story parking lot structure with tennis courts on the roof. Despite its extraordinary locale and design, on the inside it looks, feels, and operates like a typical American high school.

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